Monday, January 13, 2014

OPD Lawsuit Dismissed for Lack of Support from Councilman Mike Bonin

Councilman Ignores Community-wide Vote in Favor of OPDS

Here is a summary from VSA's attorney John Henning of what has happened with the OPD litigation against the Coastal Commission:

The case was filed in 2009, when the Coastal Commission first denied the City’s application for Overnight Restricted Parking Districts (OPDs) on the ground that they would impede public access to Venice Beach for the handful of people who actually visit the beach between 2 a.m. and 5 a.m., when OPDs would be in effect.  The City itself did not initially sue the Commission, so the Venice Stakeholders Association (VSA) initiated a lawsuit.  The City later responded to the VSA's argument that the City should defend its OPD ordinance and the community-wide vote in favor of OPDs, and joined the suit.  Both the City and VSA argued that the Commission lacks any jurisdiction over City OPD parking restrictions.

The case was stayed for almost four years while the parties tried repeatedly to settle with the Commission.  During these discussions, the City offered to make hundreds of extra parking spaces available especially for early-morning coastal visitors in City parking lots, so as to protect these visitors’ access to the beach.  The City’s offers were enough to satisfy the Commission’s staff, but each time the proposal went to the Commission itself for a hearing the Commission was swayed by transients and homeless advocates who strenuously oppose OPDs because they would restrict the use of public streets by campers, vans, and other vehicles used for living quarters.

The second and final attempt to settle the case was in June of 2013.  After the Commission denied OPDs for a third time, the City got cold feet and abandoned the lawsuit.  This left VSA in the position of having to pursue the case to trial by itself.  Although VSA was entitled to do this, the Commission’s lawyers contended that the City’s withdrawal should be interpreted to mean that the City would not pursue OPDs even if VSA were to win the case.  In October 2013, the Commission brought a motion to have the case dismissed on the ground that it was “moot,” which means that the Court could not grant any meaningful relief because of the City's apparent reluctance to implement OPDs even if the VSA won at trial.

In November 2013, the Court held a hearing and said that it was amenable to the Commission’s argument, but allowed VSA time to present evidence that the City would, in fact, pursue OPDs if VSA won the case at trial.  Beginning in early December 2013, VSA asked Councilmember Mike Bonin to provide assurances from the City's Department of Transportation and/or from the Council office itself, that OPDs were still a priority for the City and that they would be implemented if VSA won the case.  Despite multiple certified letters to Councilmember Bonin and attempts to reach him by telephone spanning more than 5 weeks, the Councilman failed to reply in any manner to VSA’s request.

On January 8, 2013, having no way to bring the case to trial in the absence of a sign of continuing City support for OPDs, VSA voluntarily dismissed the lawsuit.

Monday, June 17, 2013

Coastal Commission Ignores Its Staff's Recommendation and Settlement Agreement; Nixes OPDs.



In a sign of bad faith, the Coastal Commission at its hearing on Thursday, June 13th, refused to allow several pro-OPD speakers to make their remarks, ignored steadfast support for OPDs from its own staff, and added late requirements, which were impossible for City representatives to meet during the hearing.  This included a late demand for an up-dated parking availability study.  

If the Commission had been operating in good faith, the Commission would have requested the study before it agreed to the settlement.  In the end, the Commission gave into representatives of social service agencies, the Peace and Freedom party, Occupy Venice and homeless advocates.

The prospects for OPD were hampered going into the hearing by several developments.

The first was that the City of Los Angeles, including City Councilman Bill Rosendahl, more or less abandoned defense of its own permit application.  Some of this was just unlucky circumstances, some of this was bad faith by city officials, including Rosendahl.

Over the last three years the City lost two knowledgeable Transportation Department officials, Alan Willis and Yadi Hashemi, to early retirement.  Their replacement was at a lower experience level and was not able to forcefully present the permit application to the Commission.

Next, there was a pissing match between Bill Rosendahl and City Attorney Trutanich over who was going to present the City application to the Commission.  Bill expected the City Attorney's Office to take the lead, since it was a settlement of the City's (and VSA's) lawsuit against the Commission, while Trutanich, miffed that Rosendahl had supported Mike Feuer in the City Attorney's race, refused.  So, Bill deputized his staff attorney, Norm Kulla, to make the presentation.  We offered to brief Kulla, but he said he knew everything he needed to know.  However, in front of the Commission, he asked for little time to make the City's presentation, told the Commission that Bill supported OPD on the grounds of equity, and then pitched the presentation to our attorney John Henning, underscoring the City's lukewarm support for OPD.  John Henning did his best, but because Norm asked for so little time, neither John nor I could finish our presentations.

The fact is that Bill R. took a dive, too.  While maintaining that he strongly supported OPD, he made no effort to either change his medical appointments on the hearing date so he could attend in person or to ask the Commission staff to move the hearing back one day so he could attend.

Trutanich sent an attorney to the hearing, Jerry Sato, but not the right attorney.  He sent the litigator in his office who would prosecute the case against the Commission instead of the attorney who has worked on the issue for the last four years, Valerie Flores.  And he did not allow Sato make any remarks in support of the settlement or to answer questions.

In short, the City completely abandoned the residents who have shown majority support for OPD since the 59% vote at the library in 2009.

One also has to acknowledge that OPD opponents did their best organizing effort ever and generally avoided the shrill and venomous presentation of previous years.  And our side, well, too many of our adherents were no shows.  Too many OPD supporters gave a priority to work and child care commitments and failed to attend.

There were only 80 anti-OPD speakers, but in contrast, our side only fielded about 10 speakers in support.  Our presence was also unfairly limited by an unpublished Commission rule that once the hearing starts no more speaker cards are accepted.  We had been informed that it was unlikely that the OPD item would be heard before 10:30, but the hearing got started about 9:30, so some of our key supporters, including Harris Levey, president of the Presidents Row Neighborhood Association, and Reta Moser, a well known activist and publisher of the Triangle Update, were not allowed to speak. There were several others in this category, including Marie Hammond of the Rose Avenue Working Group.

I could go into the specious nature of the concerns that appeared to drive Commissioners "no" vote, but more important to this analysis is that the Commission's procedures do not allow anyone other than the City’s representatives to answer any concerns or questions posed by commissioners after the public comment period is closed.  So, while I or John Henning could have answered their concerns, we were precluded from answering and the City reps either didn't care or were not prepared to answer (again, City staff simply stood silent).

Of course, if the commission was comprised of professional men and women of integrity they would have read the settlement terms in advance of agreeing to it and raised their questions in a timely manner before they even agreed to the settlement.  Springing a request for a new study of early morning parking availability at the end of the hearing was, of course, unfair to the residents and the City.  But this has been the Commission's behavior all along, to keep setting the hurdle higher after the City has already met the Commission staff's expectations for adequate parking mitigation for early morning beach access and a settlement has been reached.  It's called "re-negotiating a done deal," and reflects a lack of professionalism and integrity, but the Commission is largely composed of small town council members who are not really “ready for prime time."  Usually they recognize this and support recommendations of staff, but in this case they allowed themselves to be influenced by "the mob" and ignored the well-substantiated recommendations from their own staff.

So, where to now?  Clearly, there is no reason to discuss settlement with the Commission again.  It has shown itself to be an untrustworthy negotiating partner.  The only avenue is to litigate the underlying lawsuit.  This is dependent on funding.  If enough Venice residents are outraged at being treated by the Commission as second class citizens, undeserving of the same rights to control their streets at night that the Commission allows most other coastal cities, and provide the donations, then the VSA will litigate this matter.

I'd like to thank everyone who contributed dollars, letters, emails, postcards, etc., to our effort.

Mark Ryavec

Saturday, June 8, 2013

PLEASE ATTEND THE COASTAL COMMISSION HEARING TO SUPPORT THE RIGHT OF VENICE RESIDENTS TO IMPLEMENT OVERNIGHT RESTRICTED PARKING ON THEIR BLOCK!



The City’s application for a Coastal Development Permit for Venice OPDs will be before the California Coastal Commission on Thursday, June 13, at 8:30 AM at the Long Beach City Council chambers.  This action will settle the lawsuit the VSA brought against the Commission for its earlier denial of an OPD for Venice.

Even if your street does not currently have a problem with non-resident cars taking up parking, we ask that you support your neighbors in other areas of Venice who continue to face a lack of parking at night.  OPD will allow residents to park closer to their homes and supports public safety.

PLEASE DO THE FOLLOWING:

1.       Speak in favor of OPD at the Commission’s hearing on Thursday, June 13, at 8:30 AM at the Long Beach City Council chambers at 333 West Ocean Boulevard. 

2.       Email this message to Jack Ainsworth at jainsworth@coastal.ca.gov

“I am a Venice resident and I support Overnight Restricted Parking (OPD) for Venice.”

3.   Go to www.venicenc.org and vote for OPD.

4.       Write a letter to the Commission explaining the parking issues on your block that overnight restricted parking would address:

Members of the California Coastal Commission
200 Oceangate, 10th Floor
Long Beach, CA 90802-4416
         
 Background:

The Venice Stakeholders Assn. and the City have reached a settlement with the California Coastal Commission staff that will allow Venice residents to implement overnight restricted parking (OPD) on their streets. Commission staff is recommending approval of the settlement and a revised Coastal Development Permit.  The Coastal Commission must formally approve the settlement at their June meeting on the 13th.

How OPDs work: If residents on your block petition by a two-thirds majority, the City will post signage that will limit parking from 2 AM to 5 AM to residents and their guests who have a permit. Annual permits are $15; temporary four month permits for visitors are $10; and nightly permits (for late night parties, etc.) are $1. 

With the “No Oversize Vehicle” signage, we found that those in campers and RVs won’t park in a street space in the early evening if they cannot spend the entire night in that space. We expect the OPD signs to work the same way, encouraging non-residents to seek out other parking in the early evening instead of parking in front of our homes at night (which is also a noise problem when non-residents leave bars/restaurants late at night).

The settlement in the OPD lawsuit assures the Coastal Commission that hundreds of empty parking spaces near the beach will continue to be available to early morning visitors by exempting from OPD eligibility certain metered spaces and street spaces in front of government/commercial uses within three blocks of the beach. Under the settlement, the City also agrees to accelerate the installation of bike lanes and to open six City-owned parking lots for early morning visitors, freeing up hundreds of spaces for visitors.

If you have any questions, please call Venice Stakeholders Association at (310) 392 4843 or email venicestakeholders@ca.rr.com.
Please make a donation to the VSA at venicestakeholdersassociation.org to help cover the legal costs of the litigation and negotiating the settlement.

Monday, May 27, 2013

Coastal Commission Hearing on Venice OPD June 13, 8:30 AM, at Long Beach City Council Chambers



PLEASE ACT NOW TO SUPPORT THE RIGHT OF VENICE RESIDENTS TO IMPLEMENT OVERNIGHT RESTRICTED PARKING ON THEIR BLOCK!

Four years ago we started the process to win the the right for Venice residents to implement Overnight Restricted Parking (OPD) on their blocks.

Now, the City of Los Angeles’ application for a Coastal Development Permit for OPDs will be before the California Coastal Commission on Thursday, June 13, at 8:30 AM at the Long Beach City Council chambers.  This action will settle the lawsuit the VSA brought against the Commission for its earlier denial of an OPD for Venice.

Even if your street does not currently have a problem with non-resident cars taking up parking, we ask that you support your neighbors in other areas of Venice who continue to face a lack of parking at night.  OPD will allow residents to park closer to their homes and increase public safety in general.

PLEASE DO THE FOLLOWING:

1.     If you have not received a pre-addressed postcard supporting OPD to mail to the Commission, call 310 392 4843 or send an email to venicestakeholders@ca.rr.com to pick up a postcard.

2.     Email this message to: Jack Ainsworth at jainsworth@coastal.ca.gov

“I am a Venice resident and I support Overnight Restricted Parking (OPD) for Venice.”

3.     If you have a moment, write a letter to the Commission explaining the parking issues on your block that overnight restricted parking would address:

Members of the California Coastal Commission
200 Oceangate, 10th Floor
Long Beach, CA 90802-4416

4.     Speak in favor of OPD at the Commission’s hearing on Thursday, June 13, at 8:30 AM at the Long Beach City Council chambers at 333 West Ocean Boulevard.

Background:

The Venice Stakeholders Assn. and the City have reached a settlement with the California Coastal Commission staff that will allow Venice residents to implement overnight restricted parking (OPD) on their streets. The Coastal Commission must formally approve the settlement at their June meeting on the 13th.

How OPDs work: If residents on your block petition by a two-thirds majority, the City will post signage that will limit parking from 2 AM to 5 AM to residents and their guests who have a permit. Annual permits are $15; temporary four month permits for visitors are $10; and nightly permits (for late night parties, etc.) are $1. 

With the “No Oversize Vehicle” signage, we found that those in campers and RVs won’t park in a street space in the early evening if they cannot spend the entire night in that space. We expect the OPD signs to work the same way, encouraging non-residents to seek out other parking in the early evening instead of parking in front of our homes at night (which is also a noise problem when non-residents leave bars/restaurants late at night).

The settlement in the OPD lawsuit basically assures the Coastal Commission that hundreds of empty parking spaces near the beach will continue to be available to early morning visitors by exempting from OPD eligibility certain metered spaces and street spaces in front of government/commercial uses within three blocks of the beach. Under the settlement, the City also agrees to accelerate the installation of bike lanes and to open six City owned parking lots for early morning visitors, freeing up hundreds of spaces for visitors.

If you have any questions, please call Venice Stakeholders Association at (310) 392 4843 or email venicestakeholders@ca.rr.com.

Thank you for helping improve our community.


Monday, April 8, 2013

Alert: We Need Support for OPDs and PPDs Now


NEIGHBORHOOD NEWS  |  April 9, 2013


Alert:  We Need Support for OPDs and PPDs Now


Action needed:  Please send this message to the following officials:
I support the settlement in the OPD lawsuit.  Venice needs overnight restricted parking to address loss of parking on a block-by-block basis where non-resident vehicles are taking up scarce parking at night.  The settlement provides sufficient parking close to the beach for early morning visitors.  I also support the proposal to allow residents to implement preferential parking districts (PPDs) adjacent to commercial corridors where the City and the Coastal Commission have allowed the expansion of new retail shops and restaurants without the provision of adequate off-street parking for patrons. 

Officials’ Email Addresses:
City of Los Angeles: <billrosendahl@aol.com>, <mike.bonin@lacity.org>, <Arturo.Pina@lacity.org>, <Paul.Backstrom@lacity.org>, <paola.valdivia@lacity.org>, <tamara.martin@lacity.org>, <felix.valde@lacity.org>
Neighborhood Council: <Board@VeniceNC.org>
Steve Kinsey <skinsey@marincounty.org>, Dayna Bochco c/o <ann@ceresfm.com>

(This alert is also posted at www.venicestakeholdersassocation.org for your convenience.  You can just cut and paste the message and addresses.)

Background:  As mentioned in our earlier notice, the VSA and the City have reached a tentative settlement with the California Coastal Commission staff that will give Venice residents the opportunity to implement overnight restricted parking (OPDs) on their streets.  Now the Commission must formally approve the settlement.
To recap, this means that if residents on your block petition by a two-thirds majority, the City will post signage that will limit parking from 2 AM to 5 AM to residents and their guests who have a permit.  Annual permits are $15, temporary four month permits for visitors are $10, and nightly permits (for parties, etc.) are $1.  (See links below for more information).
With the “No Oversize Vehicle” signage, we have found that those with campers and RVs will not park in a street space in the early evening if they cannot spend the entire night in that space.  We expect the OPD signs will work the same way, encouraging those who are non-residents to seek out other parking in the early evening instead of parking in front of our homes at night.
The settlement basically assures the Coastal Commission that hundreds of empty parking spaces near the beach will continue to be available to early morning visitors by exempting from OPD eligibility certain metered spaces and street spaces in front of government and commercial uses within two blocks of the beach.  Under the settlement, the City also agrees to open up several City owned parking lots (excluding the lot at Main and Rose) for early morning visitors, again freeing up hundreds of spaces (which we believe will rarely be used due to lack of demand at 5 AM, but this was the “price” of the settlement).
The City’s Department of Transportation (DOT) has also stated that at the same time the OPD settlement goes before the Commission (set for early June), DOT will present a request for “Approval in Concept” of a preferential permit parking (PPD) plan to allow residents within 1,500 feet of a commercial corridor (e.g., Rose Avenue, Abbot Kinney) to set up preferential parking districts that would limit visitor parking during the day to two or four hours between 8 AM and 6 PM and limit parking after  6 PM to residents only.  This option is desperately needed due to the tremendous success of these business corridors and the City and Coastal Commission’s failure to require adequate on-site parking at new retail shops and restaurants.

Why we need your help right now:  First, the DOT engineer who championed the OPD settlement and the preferential parking proposal for Venice has retired and it appears that DOT has not assigned another engineer to flesh out the PPD proposal.  Our requests for a written copy of the proposal have gone without reply.  Now, with Venice’s parking issues going to the Coastal Commission, it is the time for the PPD concept to be put before them as well.  Second, two leading anti-OPD advocates, Linda Lucks and David Ewing, are already orchestrating a campaign to defeat both proposals.
The ironies in their opposition are striking.  While Linda Lucks is the president of the Venice Neighborhood Council (VNC), she lives in the Del Rey neighborhood and thus will not be affected by either OPDs or PPDs.  While the official position of the VNC is support of OPDs following the 59\% vote of the residents in favor in 2009, Lucks has been organizing yet another “Town Hall” on OPDs to give anti-OPD forces another forum to try to reverse the VNC’s position.  She also has a conflict of interest, which the VSA has noted in a complaint with the Fair Political Practices Commission and the City Ethics Commission; she is a paid consultant to the Venice Community Housing Corporation, which is a vigorous opponent of OPDs. And, instead of supporting PPDs, she has called them a “red herring.”
Lucks’ partner in this effort, David Ewing, also lives outside the portion of Venice that would benefit from OPDs and PPDs.  He lives east of Lincoln, just down the street from an area of Venice that already has OPDs, in part because it is not under Coastal Commission jurisdiction.  But he wants to deny those in the part of Venice west of Lincoln the right he and his neighbors enjoy to reserve parking at night for residents and their guests.
Lucks, Ewing and their colleagues make the spurious claim that somehow visitor access to the coast will be hampered by OPDs and PPDs.  The Coastal Commission assured in the settlement terms that there will be ample parking in the early morning for years to come for the handful of fishers, joggers and surfers who arrive at 5 AM.  And PPDs would only affect commercial corridors that are at considerable distance from the coast and are not an attractive parking location for visitors for that reason.
To finally get some relief for residents to address the historic parking shortage in Venice, please send the message above to the officials listed.
And please send this request to all your Venice friends and neighbors today and ask them to send the pro-OPD/PPD message out as soon as possible.
If you have any questions, please call me at (310) 392-4843.  Many thanks for your support.         
Mark Ryavec
President, Venice Stakeholders Association

P.S. Your financial support for the VSA is also needed. This has been a long and expensive legal battle and legal bills remain. I would greatly appreciate if you would make a tax-deductible contribution to the VSA of $200 or more to help us defray these costs. Contributions can be made by PayPal through our website (venicestakeholdersassociation.org) or sent to 453 Rialto Avenue, Venice, CA  90291.

Links for info on OPD permits





Monday, March 25, 2013

Complaint Filed for Investigation of Ethics Violation by VNC President



Venice Stakeholders Calls for
Investigation of Ethics Violation by
Linda Lucks, President, Venice Neighborhood Council

The Venice Stakeholders Association (VSA) today filed a request for an investigation of an ethics violation by Linda Lucks, the president of the Venice Neighborhood Council (VNC).  The request was filed with both the State Fair Political Practices Commission and the City of Los Angeles’ Ethics Commission.

The VSA’s attorney, John Henning, called for the investigation because Ms. Lucks has failed to respond to calls for her to recuse herself from involvement with deliberations concerning overnight restricted permit parking (OPDs) in Venice, which her client, the Venice Community Housing Corporation (VCHC), has long opposed.

“Ms. Lucks’ involvement in the OPDs issue is in direct conflict with her economic interest in her paid position as Capital Campaign Coordinator at VCHC,” Henning wrote.  “On the one hand she is orchestrating a campaign to reverse the VNC's position on OPDs, and to influence the City Council to effectively abandon its own resolutions establishing OPDs, while on the other hand she is in the employ of one of the foremost opponents of OPDs.”

Citing the Los Angeles City Charter, an executive directive by Mayor Villaraigosa, and advice by the City Attorney, Henning noted that just the appearance of a conflict is enough to require a city official to withdraw from any involvement in a matter. 

Mark Ryavec, president of the VSA, said that he had emailed the full Board of the VNC some weeks ago about Lucks’ conflict of interest and had not received a reply, so the VSA felt the issue should be raised with State and City officials. 

“The residents of Venice deserve a neighborhood council free from both actual and perceived conflicts of interest so they can trust that the recommendations of the council are determined on the merits and do not reflect the wishes of narrow special interests,” Ryavec said.

For a copy of the complaint send a request to venicestakeholders@ca.rr.com.

Thursday, February 14, 2013

Overnight Restricted Parking Gains in Venice



Settlement Reached in OPD Lawsuit

We are encouraged to report that last week the California Coastal Commission tentatively approved a settlement of the VSA lawsuit, which will give Venice residents the opportunity to implement overnight restricted parking (OPDs) on their streets.
As you may remember, following the Commission’s denial of OPDs, the VSA filed a lawsuit against the Commission and the City of Los Angeles arguing that no Coastal Development Permit was required for OPD signs. Eventually, City Attorney Carmen Trutanich agreed with us and the City joined our lawsuit against the Commission. 
An earlier, tentative settlement went to the Commission about a year and half ago, but it was rejected by extremists on the Commission. In the intervening time the Commission membership has dramatically changed; “No Oversize Vehicle” signage was installed on over 100 blocks in Venice; the LAPD started to aggressively enforce the ban on sleeping in vehicles (LAMC 85.02); and Councilman Rosendahl’s Streets to Homes program was implemented, which moved over 150 people, many living in vehicles, to services and housing. 
RVs on Harding Avenue in Presidents Row 2-14-13


However, non-resident vehicles continue to occupy very limited street parking spaces in several Venice neighborhoods. In some instances, vehicle dwellers have simply moved to vans, small trucks, and SUVs, which are not subject to the restriction on oversize vehicles; this is particularly acute during the summer months. Tourists staying in boardwalk-adjacent hotels still park their rental cars overnight in residential neighborhoods. Some boardwalk vendors are now using vans as storage units for their products and parking them 24/7 on streets such as Westminster and Brooks. In other areas, auto garages and car rental companies are storing vehicles overnight on residential streets. And the larger campers and RVs keep testing the limits, taking up residence in Oakwood, on Rose Avenue, on Venice Blvd., or in the Presidents Row area until the LAPD can get around to enforcing the OVO (Oversize Vehicle Ordinance) signs or LAMC 85.02.
The VSA and its attorney John Henning have put in considerable time and effort over the last year to arrive at a settlement that will allow Venetians to install overnight restricted permit parking on their blocks from 2:00 to 5:00 a.m., providing that the individual block has demonstrated via petitions a two-thirds majority among residents in favor of the action. This solution stems from experience with the OVO signs showing that if people intent on parking overnight cannot park during those hours, they won’t park there at all.
The process of arriving at this settlement entailed cajoling the City to devote the time and staff to reach a new settlement. We also had to fight off an ill-conceived proposal from the Department of Transportation that would have given OPDs to 990 blocks in Venice while requiring 10 blocks in the Windward Traffic Circle area to convert existing parallel parking to diagonal parking and forever give up the right to have OPDs on those blocks. The VSA worked with residents to defeat that concept and instead developed a proposal to exempt from OPDs metered parking spaces and spaces fronting on government uses and commercial buildings near the beach. This assures the Coastal Commission that there will be adequate early morning street parking near the beach for fishers, surfers, and joggers before the county lots open at 6:00 a.m.
We have also heard from the DOT that it will be submitting a proposal to the Commission for an approval-in-concept for a preferential permit parking plan for commercial corridors (e.g., Abbot Kinney and Rose Avenue) that would allow residents within 1500 feet of major commercial streets to apply for 24-hour permit parking that would limit non-resident parking to a few hours, while residents with a City permit could park there with no restrictions. The VSA proposed this concept several months ago to City officials and we are pleased to see that DOT is pursuing this plan with Commission staff.
The Commission is likely to hold a hearing on the OPD Coastal Development Permit, which includes the elements of the settlement; on :
June 12, 13 or 14
at the Long Beach City Council Chambers
333 W. Ocean Boulevard, Long Beach
We will keep you posted on the hearing date and where you can send letters and emails supporting OPDs (and the Commercial Corridor Preferential Permit Plan).
In light of these developments, your financial support for the VSA would be greatly appreciated. This has been a long and expensive legal battle and legal bills remain from the last few months. We would greatly appreciate if you would make a tax-deductible contribution to the VSA of $200 or more to help us defray these costs. Contributions can be made by PayPal or sent to 453 Rialto Avenue, Venice, CA  90291.
Many thanks for all of your support!